Channel Ten’s Comedy Is A Joke

Last night Channel Ten aired a comedy parody of an advertisement that made fun of the popular series The Good Doctor. This parody occurred on the show Skit Happens and the video began with the producers making fun of how some autistic people speak and then continued along this vein to make fun of stimming and finally ending with the catch phrase ‘The Good Hospital, where everyone is on the spectrum’.

I personally don’t have an issue with people shedding a bit of light on autism in a comedic way however this video went way too far. I am extremely disappointed that Channel Ten thought this sort of material was ok to air. This sort of material is extremely offensive to those on the autism spectrum and their families who work hard to change the stigma that surrounds the spectrum. This sort of material is the reason so many people hide who they are for it tells us that society still does not see us as equal human beings and that we are different to the point of existing only for the amusement of others. I find it funny how neurotypicals are busy teaching us autistics the social norms, norms that include acceptance of difference, yet neurotypicals are the ones airing this material that teaches people that it is ok to make fun of people with different abilities. This material promotes bullying which 90% of us fall victim to and this bullying has and will continue to take lives which is no joke.

In future Channel Ten along with other television and media networks should ask themselves, would airing certain material about any social demographic be going too far? If they are not sure why not take the time to ask an individual from the demographic you are talking about. This simple yet effective practice would act as a safeguard as your audience is made up of individuals, each different, unique and amazing in their own way who together make up a world that should be a more accepting and inclusive for everyone without exception and we are looking to community influencers such as Channel Ten to set the standard and lead the way.

Bryce Pace

Autism Advocate, Blogger, Speaker

Link to video (warning may be distressing to some viewers) https://www.news.com.au/entertainment/tv/tv-shows/skit-happens-sketch-slammed-offensive-in-the-extreme/news-story/a9e125d7b6ab2694a597d1581924937a

Thanks for reading, if you have a story you would like to share with the community or have an idea for a blog post feel free to contact me at bryce.pace.autism.advocate@gmail.com full anonymity can be provided.

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The Recharge Room Kit at 2018 vicSRC Congress

The Recharge Room is all set up and ready to go at #Congress2018 I would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who helped make this space possible. The Rotary Club of Warrnambool for providing some of the funds, Kaiko Fidgets for supplying a variety of their fidgets and of course my amazing mother for running around the western suburbs of Melbourne to pick up all the items. If you are one of the 180+ students at congress be sure to check out this amazing space and provide some feedback by using #rechargedevent. This space is also available to hire for events.

Thanks

Bryce Pace

Autism Advocate, Blogger, Speaker

What is wrong with person first language?

A few months ago, at an event I was presenting at someone came up to me and asked: What is wrong with person first language? We have people with brown hair and blond hair; We have people with brown eyes and we have people with different coloured skin, isn’t that the same as having autism?
At the time I was asked these questions I had difficulty explaining why I prefer being referred to as someone on the autism spectrum and as being autistic rather than someone ‘with autism’. This person claimed that having brown eyes was the same as being on the spectrum however this is not true, and I am about to explain why. Can you be a person with gay, bi or lesbian? Can you be a person with American or Australian? Can you be a person with boy or girl? No, you can’t because that just doesn’t make sense not to mention it isn’t correct English so why can we have people ‘with autism’? When people refer to me or anyone else on the autism spectrum as someone ‘with autism’ It sounds as though we are sick, or we have some sort of disease. It sounds like we need to be ‘cured’ and treated differently. This wording makes a lot of people on the spectrum very uncomfortable because we are currently being treated as though we are sick. As though we have some sort of disease that needs to be fixed. We are being treated as having ‘special needs’ in schools and workplaces making it extremely hard for us to show people what we can do.
Being on the autism spectrum I am part of a worldwide community. We are Autistic, and we are not sick or ‘special’ we just have different abilities. We view this world differently and sometimes being autistic has its challenges however a cure for autism may also mean wiping out the amazing talent autism brings to this world. A cure might mean that we never make it to Mars or find the cure for Cancer. It may mean we never get to see another Mozart or Charles Darwin. It is not a cure we need it is acceptance and inclusion. Being Autistic is the same as being American or Australian. The Autism community is just another community in this diverse world attempting to make it a better place. Person first language may be the way all the books tell you to describe people on the spectrum however, it is a better practice to just ask the person you are talking to how they prefer to be described as everyone is unique.
Thanks
Bryce Pace
Autism Advocate, Blogger, Speaker

Thank, you for reading, if you have a story you would like to share with the community or have an idea for a blog post feel free to contact me at bryce.pace.autism.advocate@gmail.com full anonymity can be provided.

(Please note this is my own opinion and does not reflect the views of all autistic people as everyone has different preferences.)

person first language

Misrepresented In The Media

Hi all today I was informed I had been featured in an article in the Portland Observer & Guardian regarding the I CAN Network expanding to Portland. The journalist who wrote this article neglected to ask my permission to feature me in this article and in doing so misrepresented me by using false and totally unsupported quotes from myself and apparently my Blog. The claims included that I didn’t think people on the spectrum were amazing unique individuals before I was part of the I CAN mentor program. I would just like to state that this information is so far from the truth, not only have I never stated this information in any of my content but prior to being part of the I CAN program I was already an active advocate. I have always believed autistic people are amazing individuals who deserve to be treated equally in everything they do however due to my treatment in Primary school I began to see autism as a disability instead of just a different set of abilities. I would also like to let everyone know that since I moved to Bacchus Marsh late last year I have been working as an independent advocate and am no longer with the I CAN Network. Despite no longer working with The I CAN Network I do support the work they are doing for the young people of south West Victoria who are on the spectrum and would like to wish the I CAN South West team all the best with their new program in Portland.
Thanks
Bryce Pace
Autism Advocate, blogger, Speaker

Q&A with Calum Courtney

Hi all, lately I have been brainstorming some ideas of how I could better use my Youtube channel and have some very exciting news to share. Next weekend I will be filming a Q&A style video with Calum Courtney which will be the first in a series of videos where I interview inspirational people on the autism spectrum. The best part is that you guys have the opportunity to ask the questions. Do you have a burning question you would like to ask Calum or just want to show your support? feel free to leave your questions and message of support in the comments below, who knows they may be used in the video.
Be sure to keep an eye on social media for the finished video
Bryce Pace
Autism Advocate, Blogger, Speaker

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Calum Courtney’s Final Performance

Hi everyone, I just wanted to share with you Calum Courtney‘s final performance on Britains Got Talent. Unfortunately, Calum didn’t win however he did end his Britain’s Got Talent journey with a bang. You can watch his final performance at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wxvxh0y3tjM
I hope you enjoy and feel free to share this with your family and friends. If you do enjoy Calum’s singing and want to support him you can find him on facebook at Calum Courtney and on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/user/tupneycullifer.
good luck with your future endeavors Calum and keep sharing your amazing talent with the world.
Bryce Pace
Autism Advocate, Blogger, Speaker
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Calum Courtney Makes The Grand Final Of Britain’s Got Talent!

I am so pleased to say that Calum Courtney has made it through to the grand final of Britain’s Got Talent and what better way is there than rewriting a song for your mother. Calum who is 10 years old and on the autism spectrum has shown the world that being autistic is not a negative thing that we should be ashamed of. he has shown us to be proud of who we are and that you can never be too young to do something amazing. I am looking forward to seeing his final performance and who knows he may even win which would be pretty cool. Calum I would like for the last time to wish you luck and it doesn’t matter if you win or not as you have already done so much to change people’s perceptions of autism.
if you haven’t seen his semi-final performance you can find it at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbR8cOcY0vA
you can also see his reaction to making it to the grand final at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kz7Q2JNbBzQ
good luck Calum and I am really looking forward to seeing what you sing next.
Bryce Pace
Autism Advocate, Blogger, Speaker

 

Another Calum Courtney Update

I am pleased to share with you all that Calum Courtney has made it to the live semi finals of Britain’s Got Talent! I would like to congratulate Calum who at the age of ten has shown the world you can never be too young to achieve something amazing. I would also like to wish Calum luck for the semi finals and fingers crossed he gets into the grand final. If you are in the U.K be sure to vote for this amazing young man and If you haven’t already seen his audition you can find it by heading to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V-uBxwLlZac&feature=youtu.be and keep an eye out for an update when I have found a video of his last performance.Once again good luck Calum from all of us here

Bryce Pace

Autism Advocate, Blogger, Speaker

Happy Mother’s Day

Parents are an important part of any bodies life. Our parents teach us things that we can’t learn from a school, they teach us that there is no crime in being different, that being different is a blessing as life would be boring if everyone were the same. Growing up knowing that you are different from everyone else can be difficult. We get teased, bullied and sometimes hurt by people who don’t understand us, however, thanks to our parents there is a place where we can go, where we are accepted for who we are; a place where we are free to be our quirky and unique selves. A place that we call home but mean so much more than just the building we live in.
My Mother is no exception, as she taught me that there is nothing wrong with being different and most importantly She was always there for me when I most needed her. While I was being bullied in Primary school she provided a place where I was free to be myself without being judged. When I wanted to hide my diagnosis from everyone in secondary school she told no one, and when I was exhausted from hiding my true self she provided me with time to recharge and I thank her for this. When I wrote my first blog post two years ago she was proud of me however like me was not expecting what came next. Despite this, she once again stepped up and supported me by becoming my business partner. She became my extra pair of hands when I live streamed my talks, she became my second pair of eyes when I wrote an article or blog post and most importantly she became my second voice when I needed a little extra help. I am glad to have a woman like this in my life and I am Proud to be able to call this amazing woman my mum. The next time you see my mum at an event make sure you thank her as she is the reason I am who I am and is the reason I am able to advocate for a world where every young person is accepted and included no matter their ability.
Thank you, mum, for everything you do and Happy Mother’s Day
Bryce Pace
Autism Advocate, Blogger, Speaker

mothers day

Department Of Education States Violence Is Rare In Victorian Schools

The Victorian Department of Education and Training has stated that “Incidents of violence and aggressive behavior remain relatively rare in Victoria’s more than 1,500 government schools”. This statement was made in response to an incident where an autistic boy was beaten with a spanner outside of a Melbourne school a few days ago. I would like to state that this assertion is not true as there were 1850 reported incidents in schools in 2017 which is approximately 5 reports a day. From this information, I have concluded that violence is common in Victorian schools as these figures do not include or reflect the many incidents that do not get reported. I am pleased to hear that something has been done about this incident, however, what about the thousand or so other young people who didn’t get this media attention. What has happened to them?
As an advocate for young people of different abilities, it is my job to not only share these stories but look out for those who didn’t receive the media attention that this unfortunate event received and bring to light the fact that not every incident has a happy ending. 90% of people on the autism spectrum are bullied and there are about 16000 people on the autism spectrum here in Victoria. The act of bullying can involve violent acts such as the one mentioned in the article in addition to verbal and cyber attacks. One of the most common causes of death for people on the autism spectrum is suicide and I know I bring these statistics up regularly, however, we need to realise this isn’t just one incident, this kind of thing happens every day and does have the potential to end someone’s life.
Being autistic can be difficult, we sometimes miss social cues like this young adult who didn’t flinch and stand back but went in to help and do the right thing and too often as in this case we get punished for this misunderstanding due to people not understanding us. This incident is an example of why we urgently need to educate people about autism and this is why I have been proudly offering free talks to schools and youth groups such as Scouts and Guides since I began this journey of creating a more accepting and inclusive world for people on the autism spectrum.
I would like to finish by stating that if any of the things I mentioned above distressed you in any way please be sure to talk to someone you trust as your wellbeing is very important. I would also like to ask everyone to please share this as wide as possible as we need to advocate for those whose stories didn’t end with a police investigation or someone being charged. We need to bring to light what happens every day and we need to educate people about what autism is and how to better understand us in the context of today’s world.
Thank You
Bryce Pace
Autism Advocate, Blogger, Speaker
 
(Article with Pictures)

Exciting News

Hi everyone, I have some exciting news. On the 19th of May, I will be exhibiting at the Ballarat Autism Expo. This is a great opportunity for you guys to meet me in person and also have a look at some of my upcoming projects including the Recharge Room Kit. At this event, I would also like to showcase the talents of those on the autism spectrum and as part of this am currently putting together a CD of autistic singers and musicians, if you know anyone on the spectrum who is either a singer or musician please feel free to mention their name below.
Also, you may have noticed I haven’t published a blog post for a while. I am actually running out of things to write about so if you or anyone you know who is autistic or is a parent of a young person on the spectrum who would like to write about their experiences of living with autism feel free to let me know, full anonymity can be provided.
Thank you and I look forward to seeing you on the 19th of May
Bryce Pace
Autism Advocate, Blogger, Speaker

Ballarat Autism Expo Flyer

Eye Contact results in unpleasant overstimulation of the brain finally Scientifically proven

It is no secret that people on the autism spectrum don’t tend to make eye contact with other people, however, why is this? Up until recently scientists and other neurotypical people assumed it had to do with our lack of understanding of social cues and that we must be taught to make eye contact, however, this is not the case as proven by a recent study.  This recent study has found that looking someone in the eye can result in unpleasant overstimulation of the brain for people on the autism spectrum. Exactly what people on the spectrum have been trying to tell people for years however no one seems to listen to the people who have lived experience as everything needs to be scientifically proven. If you or someone you know doesn’t understand why we don’t like making eye contact please read the following articles.

http://blog.theautismsite.com/uncomfortable-eye-contact/

scientific study findings (warning a lot of scientific language)

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-03378-5

Thank You

Bryce Pace

Autism Advocate, Blogger, Speaker

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